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Internet Privacy and What You Need to Know | @CloudExpo #IoT #M2M #Cloud

There has never been a reasonable expectation of online privacy, and there never will be

There has never been a reasonable expectation of online privacy, and there never will be. Regardless of what you may have recently heard about joint resolutions or nullifications, nothing has changed. Internet Service Providers (ISPs) have always had the right to use your data as they see fit, within a few Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and Federal Communications Commission (FCC) parameters. This has not changed. And you have given FANG (Facebook, Amazon, Netflix, and Google) the right to use your data as they see fit (with a few privacy policy exceptions and within the few aforementioned FTC and FCC parameters). So regarding online privacy, for all practical purposes, absolutely nothing has changed.

What About S.J.Res.34?
Yes, the president is expected to sign S.J.Res.34, a joint resolution that nullifies the FCC’s “Protecting the Privacy of Customers of Broadband and Other Telecommunications Services” rule. But the FCC rule never went into effect. So net/net, nothing has changed.

What Does This Mean?
One side will tell you that the FCC rule was overly burdensome for ISPs because they would have had to obtain opt-in permission from each customer to use the customers’ data.

The other side will tell you that the FCC rule was absolutely necessary because ISPs have access to 100 percent of your online activity while FANG can only see what you do on their respective sites.

Most of the explanations from elected leaders failed to mention that you pay hard currency to your ISP for access to the Internet. Therefore, you would expect some privacy options (even if those options were offered at a premium price).

On the other hand, you pay for Facebook and Google with your data, so as the cliché goes, “YOU are the product,” and you should not have any expectation of privacy (other than what’s written in the user license agreement or Privacy Policy of the respective sites). As for Amazon and Netflix, you pay with both cash and data. But you can rest easy. Both Amazon and Netflix only use your data internally. While they offer insights to certain vendors, sponsors, and suppliers, the amount of actual data they make available to 2nd or 3rd parties is negligible.

Short Term
In the short term, all of this is meaningless. ISPs don’t make money selling your data (although they could), and most of them do not yet have an effective way to sell advertising. They make money by charging you for Internet access. FANG literally lives on your data. Without it, FANG would be severely disabled. But you already grant them the rights, so nothing has changed.

Long Term
There are many probable futures. For example, fully data-deregulated ISPs are free to develop “intelligence layers” between you and the network. Hypothetically, this type of AI would know where you are, where you are likely to be, what you like to do, when you like to do it, etc. In practice, it would be used to sell you stuff. It could also be useful for autonomous vehicles and IoT applications. But, as with all things, there’s a dark side. Thinking about potential abuses of this type of data-driven AI should give one pause.

Should We Have Internet Privacy Laws?
Should we have Internet privacy laws? What should we protect? Are privacy laws antithetical to a free and open Internet? Or would a well-reasoned set of privacy rules provide a level playing field and fertile ground for commerce and communication? Under this administration, it looks like whatever is in place will remain in place. For those who supported the previous administration’s worldview, it’s time to start over.

It’s a Bigger Topic
There’s more at stake than online privacy. The concepts of Net Neutrality and a free and open Internet and a set of reasonable rules that promote investments and reward investors are not mutually exclusive. We should strive for consensus. Regardless of your personal preferences, you should contact your elected officials and let them know your thoughts.

When discussing online privacy, do not just think of the Internet as a technology that transports your smartphone and web browser data. It also transports your banking data (from bank to bank), your health records (from doctor to hospital), autonomous vehicle data, Internet of Things data, municipal sensor data (such as water meters and weather data), and every other type of data that we create by interacting in a completely digital world.

What Can You Do?
Since the joint resolution passed, I’ve had a remarkable number of questions about Virtual Private Networks (VPNs) and email encryption, as if suddenly there’s a new need for these services. (BTW: We’ll discuss online privacy vs. online security in another article. They are not the same thing.)

If you didn’t need a VPN or encrypted email yesterday, you probably don’t need it today. That said, I only access the Internet through VPNs, and I encrypt communication that I would not like to see on WikiLeaks.

I do not endorse any of the following products, but I pay for and use some of them. They all work as well as consumer-grade systems can work. If you feel like you will be safer using a VPN or encrypted email, here’s a short list of options:

VPNs

Encrypted Email

What We Really Need
Data is a very valuable asset. How valuable? Have a look at the combined market cap of FANG. They, and most online businesses, transform the value of our data into their wealth. Which raises the question, should they own the data we create, or should we? If we create it, shouldn’t it be ours? I can argue both sides. Perhaps you can too. Let’s start the discussion immediately!

The post Internet Privacy 2017 | What You Need to Know originally appeared here on Shelly Palmer

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Shelly Palmer is the host of Fox Television’s "Shelly Palmer Digital Living" television show about living and working in a digital world. He is Fox 5′s (WNYW-TV New York) Tech Expert and the host of United Stations Radio Network’s, MediaBytes, a daily syndicated radio report that features insightful commentary and a unique insiders take on the biggest stories in technology, media, and entertainment.

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