Welcome!

@ThingsExpo Authors: Elizabeth White, Liz McMillan, Zakia Bouachraoui, Pat Romanski, Yeshim Deniz

Related Topics: @ThingsExpo, @CloudExpo, @DXWorldExpo

@ThingsExpo: Article

Big Data and IoT - A Match Made in Heaven | @ThingsExpo #IoT #M2M #BigData

There’s a closer relationship between big data and the IoT than most people realize

Why Big Data and the Internet of Things Are a Match Made in Heaven
By William Hayles

There’s a closer relationship between big data and the IoT than most people realize – almost as if they were made for one another. See for yourself.

Today, we’re going to talk about the Internet of Things and Big Data.

Bear with me here. This isn’t going to be some vague, half-cocked article bogged down by buzzwords and vagaries. Instead, what we’re going to do is take a close look at both technologies - what they actually are and what they actually do - in regards to how they’re changing enterprise.

More importantly, we’re going to put forth an explanation of how inextricably the two are connected - and how, by understanding that connection, one’s business can set itself well ahead of the competition. Sounds pretty good, doesn’t it? Let’s dive right in.

We’ll start by dispelling some of the mysticism and hearsay surrounding the Internet of Things.

What Exactly IS The Internet of Things?
Chances are pretty good you’ve heard the term at least once, right? You’ve probably heard at least one journalist - who may or may not have understood any of the jargon - rambling about how IoT stands ready to revolutionize enterprise. About how it’ll help businesses paint a more complete picture of their operations, employees, and consumers.

In short, you’ve heard a lot of talk about what it can do - but not necessarily a great deal about what it is.

Believe it or not, IoT is, at its core, a fairly simple concept. Basically, what it boils down to is that we’re making our products smarter. We’re embedding Internet-enabled computer chips and sensors in products and devices which traditionally had little to no computing capacity - everything from watches to car engines to generators.

Those embedded chips tend to be a little bit more limited than your run-of-the-mill PC or mobile device; usually, they’re used primarily for data-gathering, offering an enterprise details on everything from how efficiently their machines are running to the purchasing habits of their consumers. Not surprisingly, this is forcing something of a revolution in terms of Enterprise IT - both in terms of consumer products and in terms of internal technology.

“Smart, connected products require that companies build an entirely new technology infrastructure, consisting of a series of layers known as a ‘technology stack,’” explains Michael E. Porter of the Harvard Business Review. “This includes modified hardware, software applications, and an operating system embedded into the product itself; network communications to support connectivity; and a product cloud containing the product-driven database, a platform for building software applications, a rules engine and analytics platform, and smart product applications that are not embedded in the product.”

“Cutting across all the layers,” he continues, “is an identity and security structure, a gateway for accessing internal data, and tools that connect the data from smart, connected products to other business systems.”

Yeah. There’s a reason more enterprises aren’t already tapping into IoT. At this moment in time, to gain any value from the technology would require resources which all but the largest of enterprises are incapable of providing.

Still, there’s a great deal of value to be had from connected products - Porter lists control, optimization, monitoring, and autonomy as just a few of the things the IoT is capable of providing. He goes on to establish that the trend, once it gains further prominence, will serve to significantly increase the bargaining power of both suppliers and buyers, while driving competition to an all-time high.

The benefits within enterprise are just as compelling.

"IoT technologies allow for real-time and accurate data sensing and wireless transmission of that data to Web applications and servers connected to the Internet," explains Mindtree researcher Ronak Sutaria, talking to Infoworld. "This leads to a more precise and accurate monitoring and control of physical systems."

In other words, it’s going to change the market in the same way as every truly disruptive technology before it - those who can adapt to it will thrive, and those who can’t, well…

I’m sure you can figure that one out.

How IoT Will Drive Big Data Adoption
As I’m certain most of you have already surmised, the significant increase in connected devices that’s due to happen at the hands of the Internet of Things will, in turn, lead to an exponential increase in the data that an enterprise is required to manage. Here’s where IoT intersects wonderfully with big data - and where it becomes evident that the two trends fit one another like a glove.

“Once the Internet of things gets rolling, stand back,” warns Howard Baldwin, writing for Forbes. “We’re going to have data spewing at us from all directions - from appliances, from machinery, from train tracks, from shipping containers, from power stations. If that doesn’t get you thinking how to handle real-time data feeds, nothing will.”

“But here’s a suggestion,” he adds. “Start now.”

Fact is; the Internet of Things is still very much a nascent trend - it’s still in its infancy. It hasn’t started to produce an overwhelming deluge of information. But that doesn’t mean it won’t.

Big data, on the other hand, has been around for a while; long enough that it’s starting to come into its own. Analytics tools designed to handle large, fast-changing volumes of information are gradually becoming accessible to small and midsized organizations, while data science is looked upon as a legitimate - and highly-valued- field of study. In short, for most businesses, the timing has never been better to look into the adoption of a big data strategy.

“The Internet of Things will lead to an unimaginable explosion of data,” reads a piece on Big Think. “Listening to that data, making sense of it, and effectively acting on that information will be essential, and this massive shift that’s underway will no doubt help businesses do just that.”

In Closing
The Internet of Things is still a relatively new concept. While larger enterprises like Coca-Cola, General Electric, and Domino’s Pizza have managed to tap into its value, most businesses will have to wait some time before they can really enjoy the advantages of embedded sensor technology. In the meantime, it’s imperative that those businesses prepare by adopting a big data strategy - and looking into analytics technology.

Big data capacity is, in essence, a prerequisite to tapping into the Internet of Things. Without the proper data-gathering in place, it’ll be impossible for businesses to sort through all the information flowing in from embedded sensors. What that means is that, without big data, the Internet of Things can offer an enterprise little more than noise.

About William - Will Hayles is a technical writer and blogger for Outscale, a leading cloud hosting provider in the USA and France.

The post Why Big Data And The Internet of Things Are A Match Made In Heaven appeared first on CTOvision.com.

More Stories By Bob Gourley

Bob Gourley writes on enterprise IT. He is a founder of Crucial Point and publisher of CTOvision.com

IoT & Smart Cities Stories
Nicolas Fierro is CEO of MIMIR Blockchain Solutions. He is a programmer, technologist, and operations dev who has worked with Ethereum and blockchain since 2014. His knowledge in blockchain dates to when he performed dev ops services to the Ethereum Foundation as one the privileged few developers to work with the original core team in Switzerland.
Andrew Keys is Co-Founder of ConsenSys Enterprise. He comes to ConsenSys Enterprise with capital markets, technology and entrepreneurial experience. Previously, he worked for UBS investment bank in equities analysis. Later, he was responsible for the creation and distribution of life settlement products to hedge funds and investment banks. After, he co-founded a revenue cycle management company where he learned about Bitcoin and eventually Ethereal. Andrew's role at ConsenSys Enterprise is a mul...
René Bostic is the Technical VP of the IBM Cloud Unit in North America. Enjoying her career with IBM during the modern millennial technological era, she is an expert in cloud computing, DevOps and emerging cloud technologies such as Blockchain. Her strengths and core competencies include a proven record of accomplishments in consensus building at all levels to assess, plan, and implement enterprise and cloud computing solutions. René is a member of the Society of Women Engineers (SWE) and a m...
If a machine can invent, does this mean the end of the patent system as we know it? The patent system, both in the US and Europe, allows companies to protect their inventions and helps foster innovation. However, Artificial Intelligence (AI) could be set to disrupt the patent system as we know it. This talk will examine how AI may change the patent landscape in the years to come. Furthermore, ways in which companies can best protect their AI related inventions will be examined from both a US and...
In his general session at 19th Cloud Expo, Manish Dixit, VP of Product and Engineering at Dice, discussed how Dice leverages data insights and tools to help both tech professionals and recruiters better understand how skills relate to each other and which skills are in high demand using interactive visualizations and salary indicator tools to maximize earning potential. Manish Dixit is VP of Product and Engineering at Dice. As the leader of the Product, Engineering and Data Sciences team at D...
Bill Schmarzo, Tech Chair of "Big Data | Analytics" of upcoming CloudEXPO | DXWorldEXPO New York (November 12-13, 2018, New York City) today announced the outline and schedule of the track. "The track has been designed in experience/degree order," said Schmarzo. "So, that folks who attend the entire track can leave the conference with some of the skills necessary to get their work done when they get back to their offices. It actually ties back to some work that I'm doing at the University of San...
When talking IoT we often focus on the devices, the sensors, the hardware itself. The new smart appliances, the new smart or self-driving cars (which are amalgamations of many ‘things'). When we are looking at the world of IoT, we should take a step back, look at the big picture. What value are these devices providing. IoT is not about the devices, its about the data consumed and generated. The devices are tools, mechanisms, conduits. This paper discusses the considerations when dealing with the...
Bill Schmarzo, author of "Big Data: Understanding How Data Powers Big Business" and "Big Data MBA: Driving Business Strategies with Data Science," is responsible for setting the strategy and defining the Big Data service offerings and capabilities for EMC Global Services Big Data Practice. As the CTO for the Big Data Practice, he is responsible for working with organizations to help them identify where and how to start their big data journeys. He's written several white papers, is an avid blogge...
Dynatrace is an application performance management software company with products for the information technology departments and digital business owners of medium and large businesses. Building the Future of Monitoring with Artificial Intelligence. Today we can collect lots and lots of performance data. We build beautiful dashboards and even have fancy query languages to access and transform the data. Still performance data is a secret language only a couple of people understand. The more busine...
Enterprises have taken advantage of IoT to achieve important revenue and cost advantages. What is less apparent is how incumbent enterprises operating at scale have, following success with IoT, built analytic, operations management and software development capabilities - ranging from autonomous vehicles to manageable robotics installations. They have embraced these capabilities as if they were Silicon Valley startups.