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Jason Bloomberg: Seven Reasons Why the Internet of Things is Doomed

InsightaaS: Who doesn’t love a curmudgeonly cynic? Well, there are probably many people in that category, but Across the Net is cynic-friendly, and we tend to cast a kindly eye on curmudgeons as well, especially when they are tweaking conventional wisdom. It’s natural, then, that we would be fans of the perspective that author/analyst Jason Bloomberg, managing partner of Intellyx (“Intellyx is the first and only advisory, training, and industry analysis firm focused on architecting agility for the enterprise”) published recently on “seven reasons why the Internet of Things is doomed.” insightasaService-21In it, he takes aim at some of the key issues that impede IoT adoption today – security, privacy, the need to assemble ecosystems of components and software, lack of a ‘killer app,’ the need for enterprise customers to continue to invest in core technology rather than the “frosting” of digital transformation – and two issues that may be more difficult to quantify, but could well be even more pernicious than the other five: “digital fatigue” with hyper-connected lives (“Can’t we just download a big-ass OFF switch so we can hear ourselves freakin’ THINK for once?”) and the inherent tension between individuals’ desire to control their own data, and the profit potential associated with corporate control of individual data.

Read the entire article at http://www.insightaas.com/jason-bloomberg-seven-reasons-why-the-internet-of-things-is-doomed/.

Read the original blog entry...

More Stories By Jason Bloomberg

Jason Bloomberg is the leading expert on architecting agility for the enterprise. As president of Intellyx, Mr. Bloomberg brings his years of thought leadership in the areas of Cloud Computing, Enterprise Architecture, and Service-Oriented Architecture to a global clientele of business executives, architects, software vendors, and Cloud service providers looking to achieve technology-enabled business agility across their organizations and for their customers. His latest book, The Agile Architecture Revolution (John Wiley & Sons, 2013), sets the stage for Mr. Bloomberg’s groundbreaking Agile Architecture vision.

Mr. Bloomberg is perhaps best known for his twelve years at ZapThink, where he created and delivered the Licensed ZapThink Architect (LZA) SOA course and associated credential, certifying over 1,700 professionals worldwide. He is one of the original Managing Partners of ZapThink LLC, the leading SOA advisory and analysis firm, which was acquired by Dovel Technologies in 2011. He now runs the successor to the LZA program, the Bloomberg Agile Architecture Course, around the world.

Mr. Bloomberg is a frequent conference speaker and prolific writer. He has published over 500 articles, spoken at over 300 conferences, Webinars, and other events, and has been quoted in the press over 1,400 times as the leading expert on agile approaches to architecture in the enterprise.

Mr. Bloomberg’s previous book, Service Orient or Be Doomed! How Service Orientation Will Change Your Business (John Wiley & Sons, 2006, coauthored with Ron Schmelzer), is recognized as the leading business book on Service Orientation. He also co-authored the books XML and Web Services Unleashed (SAMS Publishing, 2002), and Web Page Scripting Techniques (Hayden Books, 1996).

Prior to ZapThink, Mr. Bloomberg built a diverse background in eBusiness technology management and industry analysis, including serving as a senior analyst in IDC’s eBusiness Advisory group, as well as holding eBusiness management positions at USWeb/CKS (later marchFIRST) and WaveBend Solutions (now Hitachi Consulting).

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