Welcome!

IoT Expo Authors: Dana Gardner, Peter Silva, Elizabeth White, Pat Romanski, Roger Strukhoff

News Feed Item

Global CSP Billing Part 4a: Rating & Charging and Other Core Billing Business Drivers and Market Trends

NEW YORK, April 8, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Reportlinker.com announces that a new market research report is available in its catalogue:

Global CSP Billing Part 4a: Rating & Charging and Other Core Billing Business Drivers and Market Trends
http://www.reportlinker.com/p02063434/Global-CSP-Billing-Part-4a-Rating--Charging-and-Other-Core-Billing-Business-Drivers-and-Market-Trends.html#utm_source=prnewswire&utm_medium=pr&utm_campaign=IT_Hosting

Rating & Charging and Other Core Billing Business Drivers and Market Trends examines the business drivers and market trends unfolding in the global rating & charging and other core billing (invoicing, taxes, payments, accounts receivable, collections and journaling) marketplace.

Executive Summary


Stratecast has taken a deep dive into the changing communications marketplace, and evaluated the role of billing and policy management within the communications service provider (CSP) business support system (BSS) operations. Stratecast views billing and policy management as inextricably linked; and, as such, launched a major study of over global suppliers that offer a variety of billing, policy management, or combined solutions. The results of this work include a report concentrated on policy management, and a multi-part report series focused on the end-to-end billing marketplace, as detailed below:

Global CSP Policy Management Strategy Definition and Solution Supplier Market Analysis examines how the policy rules and policy enforcement functions are presently realized in connection with convergent rating & charging. This report provides a market share analysis for the Policy and Charging Rules Function (PCRF) and Policy and Charging Enforcement Function (PCEF) segments. It also delivers a five-year market forecast for each. The report identifies a number of solution suppliers that address these business functions, in addition to providing company-level profiles for a selection of them. It was published in March 2013 as Stratecast report OSSCS 14-03, Global CSP Policy Management Strategy Definition and Solution Supplier Market Analysis.


Global CSP Billing Part 1: Billing Market Business Requirements Survey Analysis. Global CSP Billing Part 1 examines the market forces that are driving change within the global billing market, and provides a close look at the billing solution requirements that must be addressed by the supplier community as the CSP market continues to evolve. It was published as two documents:

Global CSP Billing 2013 Edition Part 1a: Market Drivers, Changing Strategies, and New Business Models looks into the forces that are redefining the current CSP landscape, and explains how new business models are essential for engaging in new monetization strategies needed to offset declining revenues in traditional voice, text, and data access services. It was published as OSSCS 14-05, Global CSP Billing Part 1a – 2013 Edition: Market Drivers, Changing Strategies and New Business Models, July
2013.

Global CSP Billing 2013 Edition Part 1b: Business Requirements Market Survey Analysis provides a perspective on the billing solution requirements that must be addressed to meet current CSP business needs, and to flexibly meet new
customer service options. It delivers a view of the Stratecast survey findings concerning business and technology billing solution requirements deemed important by the global CSP community. It was published as OSSCS 14-06, Global CSP Billing Part 1b – 2013 Edition: Business Requirements Market Survey Analysis, July 2013.


Global CSP Billing Part 2: Global CSP End-to-End Billing Market. Global CSP Billing Part 2 examines the business strategies for billing; what is contained within the overall CSP billing marketplace; and identifies more than suppliers that address various aspects of the end-to-end billing supplier market. It was published as two documents:

Global CSP Billing 2013 Edition Part 2a: Global Business Drivers, Market Trends, and New Solution Strategies describes the changes in today's CSP marketplace that require a keener focus on the customer experience. The report places the significance of billing systems upgrades in a broader picture, to reflect on the needs of not just the CSP billing marketplace but accommodation of the requirements from changing business models that engage with other industries. It was published as OSSCS 14-07, Global CSP Billing 2013 Edition Part 2a: Global Business Drivers, Market Trends, and New Solution Strategies, August 2013.


Global CSP Billing 2013 Edition Part 2b: Global Billing Market Share Analysis, Forecast, and Supplier Identification offers a five-year market forecast of the overall billing market, identifies the overall billing industry leaders, and highlights billing solution leaders by revenue within the following regions: North America (NA); Mexico, Central America, Caribbean, and South America (LATAM); Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA); and Asia-Pacific (APAC). It was published as OSSCS 14-08, Global CSP Billing 2013 Edition Part 2b: Global Billing Market Share Analysis, Forecast, and Supplier Identification, August, 2013.

Global CSP Billing Part 3: Billing Mediation. Global CSP Billing Part 3 examines the billing mediation sector—the first of four major billing sub-sectors that address the monetization needs of the global CSP marketplace. It is published as two documents:


Global CSP Billing 2013 Edition Part 3a: Billing Mediation Business Drivers and Market Trends analyzes the key business drivers that are shaping the global billing mediation market, and looks at the trends within that market. This report was
published as OSSCS 14-12, Global CSP Billing 2013 Edition Part 3a: Billing Mediation Business Drivers and Market Trends, November 2013.

Global CSP Billing 2013 Edition Part 3b: Billing Mediation Market Share Analysis, Forecast, and Global Supplier Assessment delivers an assessment and market profiles for approximately suppliers, provides a market share analysis
based on recent financial information, and establishes a five-year forecast for the billing mediation market. This report was published as OSSCS 14-13, Global CSP Billing 2013 Edition Part 3b: Billing Mediation Market Share Analysis, Forecast, and Global
Supplier Assessment, December, 2013.


Global CSP Billing Part 4: Rating & Charging and Other Core Billing. Global CSP Billing Part 4 examines the rating & charging and other core billing sector—the second of four major billing sub-sectors that address the monetization needs of the global CSP
marketplace. It is published as two documents:

This Report – Global CSP Billing Part 4a: Rating & Charging and Other Core Billing Business Drivers and Market Trends examines the business drivers andmarket trends unfolding in the global rating & charging and other core billing
(invoicing, taxes, payments, accounts receivable, collections and journaling) marketplace.
Some of the most noteworthy insights are:

Convergent rating & charging is the keystone of modern business-to-consumer (B2C) billing, but a convergent rating & charging engine is not enough. Close integration between rating & charging and other business functions, such as policy and mediation, is needed to form end-to-end solutions to meet the needs of complex service offerings.


Best-of-breed billing component implementations are now giving way to best-of-suite solutions from a single supplier that can address all business support needs. Best-of-suite solutions are more cost effective to operate, and can be delivered through a software license model or as a cloud service.


Purpose-built analytics, tied to CSP billing systems, can address the business need for real-time decisioning—the ability to gain insight about current customer behavior, and then take advantage of the opportunity to offer something additional at the point of peak customer attention. This is the next important development in an end-to-end billing solution strategy.

Many rating & charging solutions focus entirely on the B2C segment, with its millions of customers and relatively small number of service options. The complex service monetization needs of the business-to-business (B2B) segment offer great opportunities to CSPs and to those suppliers whose billing solutions can support flexible contracts and negotiable pricing.


New business models need both B2C and B2B billing capabilities enabled, in part, by real-time, policy-enabled rating & charging. Such models include support for bundled cloud (Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS), Platform as a Service (PaaS), and Software as a Service (SaaS)) services, cross-industry multi-partner virtual services, and M2M.


The effects of virtual network technologies are still evolving, but will impact all segments of CSP billing in the months ahead. As the operations & monetization (O&M)3 requirements for virtual networks formalizes through the standards process, many solution suppliers will advance their agendas. As solutions are made available, they will further drive new requirements when existing capabilities are tested and implemented. Ultimately, CSP business momentum will solidify the requirements and O&M solution processes for virtual network implementation and operation.

Table of Contents



Executive Summary . 5
Market Definition of End-to-End Billing . 9
Mediation 2.0 (Off-line and Online) 10
Rating & Charging and Other Core Billing 11
Policy Management (Rules Function) 13
Interconnect & Settlement and Content Partner Management 13
Real-Time Rating & Charging for Improved B2C Business Outcomes 14
B2C Convergent Charging and Single Supplier Solutions Really Make a Difference 14
Advanced B2C Services and Policy-Enabled Real-Time Rating & Charging 16
Billing Analytics Brings New B2C Services and Business Opportunity . 17
Complex Services Monetization – Enterprise B2B 19
Automating the B2B Billing Processes are Now a Must . 19
B2B Billing Solution Architecture: Similar But Different to B2C Billing Solutions 21
B2B Services Require Flexible Contracts and Negotiable Pricing . 22
New Business Models Need Advanced B2C and B2B Billing 23

New Business Models Are Today's Reality 24
The Cloud Services Model 24
Cross-Industry 2.0 Model . 25
M2M Business Model . 27
Next Up: Virtual Networks – A Page from the Enterprise IT Playbook . 29
CSP Virtual Networks as an Alternative to Physical Transport Networks are Here . 29
The Virtual Network: Importance of Operations & Monetization. 30
The Key Business Benefits for Services Defined Through a Virtual Network . 32
Rating & Charging: The Market Ahead . 33
What Does the New Business Landscape Mean for CSP Billing? . 33
Where is CSP Billing Heading Next? 34
Opportunities Abound 36
The Last Word 38

List of Figures
Figure 1: CSP End-to-End Billing and Policy Management . 9
Figure 2: Convergent Charging and Other Core Billing 11
Figure 3: Single Supplier Approach for End-to-End Billing 14
Figure 4: Operations & Monetization (O&M) Solution Evolution Lifecycle. 16
Figure 5: Integrated Real-Time Charging and Advanced Revenue Management 18
Figure 6: Complex Enterprise Services Means Configurable Offerings and Pricing Plans 20
Figure 7: Complex Services Monetization and Partner Compensation . 21
Figure 8: The Vision of a CSP-Enabled Ecosystem with Traditional and New Business 26
Figure 9: Business Solutions with M2M Instrumentation 28
Figure 10: Virtual Network Architecture with O&M Support Functions . 31
Figure 11: Where is Our Industry Heading in the Next Five Years? 35

To order this report: Global CSP Billing Part 4a: Rating & Charging and Other Core Billing Business Drivers and Market Trends
http://www.reportlinker.com/p02063434/Global-CSP-Billing-Part-4a-Rating--Charging-and-Other-Core-Billing-Business-Drivers-and-Market-Trends.html#utm_source=prnewswire&utm_medium=pr&utm_campaign=IT_Hosting

__________________________
Contact Clare: [email protected]
US: (339)-368-6001
Intl: +1 339-368-6001

SOURCE Reportlinker

More Stories By PR Newswire

Copyright © 2007 PR Newswire. All rights reserved. Republication or redistribution of PRNewswire content is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of PRNewswire. PRNewswire shall not be liable for any errors or delays in the content, or for any actions taken in reliance thereon.

Latest Stories from IoT Journal
The Open Group and BriefingsDirect recently assembled a distinguished panel at The Open Group Boston Conference 2014 to explore the practical implications and limits of the Internet of Things. This so-called Internet of Things means more data, more cloud connectivity and management, and an additional tier of “things” that are going to be part of the mobile edge -- and extending that mobile edge ever deeper into even our own bodies. Yet the Internet of Things is more than the “things” – it means a higher order of software platforms. For example, if we are going to operate data centers with new dexterity thanks to software-defined networking (SDN) and storage (SDS) -- indeed the entire data center being software-defined (SDDC) -- then why not a software-defined automobile, or factory floor, or hospital operating room -- or even a software-defined city block or neighborhood?
BetaBoston is reporting a shake-up at LogMeIn's Xively Internet of Things division. "Several top execs focused on launching new services to support the “Internet of Things” — sometimes called machine-to-machine communication, or M2M — have left Boston-based LogMeIn in recent months. Among those who have left the Xively division in 2014 are chief technology officer Philip DesAutels; Chad Jones, a vice president of strategy; and Les Yetton, the one-time general manager of the group."
Enthusiasm for the Internet of Things has reached an all-time high. In 2013 alone, venture capitalists spent more than $1 billion dollars investing in the IoT space. With “smart” appliances and devices, IoT covers wearable smart devices, cloud services to hardware companies. Nest, a Google company, detects temperatures inside homes and automatically adjusts it by tracking its user’s habit. These technologies are quickly developing and with it come challenges such as bridging infrastructure gaps, abiding by privacy concerns and making the concept a reality. These challenges can’t be addressed without the kinds of agile software development and infrastructure approaches pioneered by the DevOps movement.
Predicted by Gartner to add $1.9 trillion to the global economy by 2020, the Internet of Everything (IoE) is based on the idea that devices, systems and services will connect in simple, transparent ways, enabling seamless interactions among devices across brands and sectors. As this vision unfolds, it is clear that no single company can accomplish the level of interoperability required to support the horizontal aspects of the IoE. The AllSeen Alliance, announced in December 2013, was formed with the goal to advance IoE adoption and innovation in the connected home, healthcare, education, automotive and enterprise. Members of this nonprofit consortium include some of the world’s leading, consumer electronics manufacturers, home appliances manufacturers, service providers, retailers, enterprise technology companies, startups, and chipset manufacturers. Initially based on the AllJoyn™ open source project, the AllJoyn software and services framework will be expanded with contributions from member companies and the open source community.
There’s Big Data, then there’s really Big Data from the Internet of Things. IoT is evolving to include many data possibilities like new types of event, log and network data. The volumes are enormous, generating tens of billions of logs per day, which raise data challenges. Early IoT deployments are relying heavily on both the cloud and managed service providers to navigate these challenges. In her session at 6th Big Data Expo®, Hannah Smalltree, Director at Treasure Data, to discuss how IoT, Big Data and deployments are processing massive data volumes from wearables, utilities and other machines.
Larry Ellison turned 70 and has decided to turn over the CEO reins at Oracle. Safra Catz and Mark Hurd, both in their 50s, will function as a “Ms. Inside and Mr. Outside” as co-CEOs, at least for awhile. Serious reverberations will be felt within this highly competitive company and the highly competitive industry in which it makes its money. Even while guiding his yacht to an America's Cup title, Larry Ellison remained in firm control of the company he founded in 1977. He still has an ownership stake of about 20% of the company--1 billion or so shares of Oracle stock worth about $40 billion. Who can imagine that he'll be a docile, passive Chairman? Yes, he is returning as Chairman, with Jeff Henley, currently in that role, moving aside to be Vice-Chairman. Ellison reports he will also serve as Chief Technology Officer. So it's clear he's not fading from the scene. But he will not be able to micromanage the company by any measure. What Does It Mean? Think of all of the very strong executives over the years who rose quickly and highly in Oracle, only to be banished from the kingdom and/or to start their own big companies. Ray Lane, Marc Benioff, and Tom Siebel spring i...
Explosive growth in connected devices. Enormous amounts of data for collection and analysis. Critical use of data for split-second decision making and actionable information. All three are factors in making the Internet of Things a reality. Yet, any one factor would have an IT organization pondering its infrastructure strategy. How should your organization enhance its IT framework to enable an Internet of Things implementation? In his session at Internet of @ThingsExpo, James Kirkland, Chief Architect for the Internet of Things and Intelligent Systems at Red Hat, will describe how to revolutionize your architecture and create an integrated, interoperable, reliable system of thousands of devices. Using real-world examples, James will discuss the transformative process taken by companies in moving from a two-tier to a three-tier topology for IoT implementations.
Technology is enabling a new approach to collecting and using data. This approach, commonly referred to as the “Internet of Things” (IoT), enables businesses to use real-time data from all sorts of things including machines, devices and sensors to make better decisions, improve customer service, and lower the risk in the creation of new revenue opportunities. In his session at Internet of @ThingsExpo, Dave Wagstaff, Vice President and Chief Architect at BSQUARE Corporation, will discuss the real benefits to focus on, how to understand the requirements of a successful solution, the flow of data, and how to best approach deploying an IoT solution that will drive results.
I write and study often on the subject of digital transformation - the digital transformation of industries, markets, products, business models, etc. In brief, digital transformation is about the impact that collected and analyzed data can have when used to enhance business processes and workflows. If Amazon knows your preferences for particular books and films based upon captured data, then they can apply analytics to predict related books and films that you may like. This improves sales. This is a simple example, but let me tell you what I learned yesterday in sunny and warm San Francisco about more complex applications.
IoT is still a vague buzzword for many people. In his session at Internet of @ThingsExpo, Mike Kavis, Vice President & Principal Cloud Architect at Cloud Technology Partners, will discuss the business value of IoT that goes far beyond the general public's perception that IoT is all about wearables and home consumer services. The presentation will also discuss how IoT is perceived by investors and how venture capitalist access this space. Other topics to discuss are barriers to success, what is new, what is old, and what the future may hold.
The Domain Name Service (DNS) is one of the most important components in networking infrastructure, enabling users and services to access applications by translating URLs (names) into IP addresses (numbers). Because every icon and URL and all embedded content on a website requires a DNS lookup loading complex sites necessitates hundreds of DNS queries. In addition, as more internet-enabled ‘Things’ get connected, people will rely on DNS to name and find their fridges, toasters and toilets. According to a recent IDG Research Services Survey this rate of traffic will only grow. What’s driving this increase? The growth in volume is largely attributed to the rollout of new services and applications along with expanding migration to the cloud and traffic spikes. The Internet of Things will also place a strain on DNS services. Are you ready for this surge of new services and applications along with potential DNS threats?
Building low cost wearable devices can enhance the quality of our lives. In his session at Internet of @ThingsExpo, Sai Yamanoor, Embedded Software Engineer at Altschool, will provide an example of putting together a small keychain within a $50 budget that educates the user about the air quality in their surroundings. He will also provide examples such as building a wearable device that provides transit or recreational information. He will review the resources available to build wearable devices at home including open source hardware, the raw materials required and the options available to power such wearable devices.
Where historically app development would require developers to manage device functionality, application environment and application logic, today new platforms are emerging that are IoT focused and arm developers with cloud based connectivity and communications, development, monitoring, management and analytics tools. In her session at Internet of @ThingsExpo, Seema Jethani, Director of Product Management at Basho Technologies, will explore how to rapidly prototype using IoT cloud platforms and choose the right platform to match application requirements, security and privacy needs, data management capabilities and development tools.
P2P RTC will impact the landscape of communications, shifting from traditional telephony style communications models to OTT (Over-The-Top) cloud assisted & PaaS (Platform as a Service) communication services. The P2P shift will impact many areas of our lives, from mobile communication, human interactive web services, RTC and telephony infrastructure, user federation, security and privacy implications, business costs, and scalability. In his session at Internet of @ThingsExpo, Erik Lagerway, Co-founder of Hookflash, will walk through the shifting landscape of traditional telephone and voice services to the modern P2P RTC era of OTT cloud assisted services.
We were in contact recently with Shrikant Pattathil (pictured below), Executive Vice President of Harbinger Systems. Here are some of his thoughts about healthcare, the IoT, and disruption: IoT Journal: Healthcare, with all of its systems and dataflows, seems an ideal area for IoT solutions. What is Harbinger Systems doing in this area? Shrikant Pattathil: Being a service provider we work with many product development companies who are building new IoT-based applications to solve problems that plague the healthcare industry. For example, there is a need for applications to manage your medicine dosage, seek help, and notify your care provider. IoT Journal: And how do you go about addressing these problems? Shrikant: We are approaching IoT from mobile and cloud perspective. These are our key strengths. We are helping product companies in IoT space to quickly build the mobile interfaces for their product offerings. We are also helping them to place the data on the cloud in a secure way, so that they can truly exploit the benefits of IoT. IoT Journal: What are the advantages of the IoT here? Cost? Better care? What sorts of metrics can be applied, and are there intangibles as ...