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Mobility News Weekly – Week of January 26, 2014

The Mobility News Weekly is an online newsletter made up of the most interesting news and articles related to enterprise mobility that I run across each week.  I am specifically targeting information that reflects market data and trends.

Also read Enterprise Mobility Asia News Weekly
Also read Field Mobility News Weekly
Also read M2M News Weekly
Also read Mobile Commerce News Weekly
Also read Mobile Cyber Security News Weekly
Also read Mobile Health News Weekly

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Apple sold 51 million iPhones during the last three months of 2013, up from 47.8 million a year earlier. But Wall Street analysts were expecting closer to 57 million iPhones, after Apple launched its new iPhone 5S and 5C smartphones in China simultaneously with the United States and Western Europe for the first time this fall. Read Original Content

Google has patented a way of linking online ads to free or discounted taxi rides to the advertising restaurant, shop or entertainment venue.  The transport-linked ad service could encourage consumers to respond more often to location-based special offers, experts say.  Read Original Content

The True Cost of Mobility - Companies are under tremendous pressure to develop and deploy mobile apps for their business systems, yet the traditional approach to mobile app development typically costs $250K+ and takes 6+ months for a single app. Today IT professionals are exploring platforms that radically reduce costs and time-to-market for their mobile initiatives, especially around complex applications such as SAP, Oracle, or custom applications. Download the whitepaper - https://www.capriza.com/resources/whitepapers/?resource=true-cost-of-enterprise-mobility&adgroup=MES

Market research company IDC says a total of 1,004.2 million smartphones were sold worldwide in 2013, up 38.4 percent from the 725.3 million units in 2012.  Read Original Content

Apple’s stock was tumbling in trading earlier this week, hurt by a lackluster first-quarter performance and a cautious second-quarter revenue outlook. Apple Inc. said it sold more iPhones and iPads in the first quarter than in any prior quarter, but investors were expecting even bigger things from the Cupertino company.  Read Original Content
According to Flurry Analytics, overall app use in 2013 posted 115 percent year-over-year growth.  Read Original Content

Residential real estate marketing is moving into the mobile age. The Urban Living App is a custom mobile application for the residential for-sale and for-rent communities. The app gives real estate professionals a customizable platform while harnessing social media to highlight neighborhood features and provide updates to buyers and renters.  Read Original Content

A report and statistics published by analytics company Katar Worldpanel show that Android held a majority share of the smartphone market in all regions worldwide in the last three months of 2013.  Read Original Content

According to MarketsandMarkets, the total BYOD and Enterprise Mobility market is expected to reach $181.39 billion by 2017 with a compound annual growth rate of 15.17 percent.  Read Original Content

ZTE is about to join the likes of Kyocera and Casio and launch its very first rugged smartphone. The newly leaked ZTE G601U comes with “usual for these kind of devices” mediocre specs along with a rock-solid body that should keep it working even under the harshest of conditions.  Read Original Content

U.S. chipmaker Qualcomm Inc has acquired patents of smartphone maker Palm Inc. from Hewlett-Packard Co, for an undisclosed sum.  Read Original Content

After testing the top 500 Android applications, MetaIntell identified that approximately 460 of those 500 Android applications (available in apps stores such as Amazon, CNET, GETJAR, and Google Play) create a security or privacy risk when downloaded to Android devices.  Read Original Content

A new study by Distimo, a mobile apps research firm, found Asia was the most lucrative mobile app market in the world. It said 41 percent of global app revenue in December came from Asia, while 31 percent came from North America and 23 percent from Europe.  Read Original Content

A new sugar powered battery could be powering our smartphones and tablets in as little three years, according to researchers. A team from Virginia Tech College of Agriculture and Life Sciences has developed the small power tool using partially digested starch found in foods like potatoes.  Read Original Content

Around 50 percent of the consumers in Delhi-NCR region use e-commerce websites as a medium of information and product search before buying them offline, says a Zinnov study.  Read Original Content

Recent Articles by Kevin Benedict

Using Mobility to Build an Empire
14 Ways Strategic Enterprise Mobility Solutions Can Help Build an Empire
The Roman Road and Enterprise Mobility
Mobile Expert Opinion: Mobile Platform as a Service by Peter Rogers
Mobile Expert Interview: Mary Brittain-White
Mobile Expert Interview: Glenn Johnson and Kevin Benedict
Mobile Expert Interview: Yuval Scarlat on Cloud Mobility
Mind the Gap - Enterprise Mobility and Digital Transformation

Webinars of Note (Recorded)

Rapidly extend any enterprise application to mobile devices without coding, APIs, or integration.

Whitepapers of Note

Don't Get SMACked - How Social, Mobile, Analytics and Cloud are Reshaping the Enterprise
Making BYOD Work for Your Organization
Managing BYOD and Legacy Systems
The Secret to Enterprise Mobile Application Adoption
Solving The Mobile Developer Scarcity Problem
The True Cost of Mobility

*************************************************************
Kevin Benedict
Senior Analyst, Digital Transformation Cognizant
View my profile on LinkedIn
Learn about mobile strategies at MobileEnterpriseStrategies.com
Follow me on Twitter @krbenedict
Join the Linkedin Group Strategic Enterprise Mobility

***Full Disclosure: These are my personal opinions. No company is silly enough to claim them. I am a mobility and digital transformation analyst, consultant and writer. I work with and have worked with many of the companies mentioned in my articles.

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More Stories By Kevin Benedict

Kevin Benedict is the Senior Analyst for Digital Transformation at Cognizant, a writer, speaker and SAP Mentor Alumnus. Follow him on Twitter @krbenedict. He is a popular speaker around the world on the topic of digital transformation and enterprise mobility. He maintains a busy schedule researching, writing and speaking at events in North America, Asia and Europe. He has over 25 years of experience working in the enterprise IT solutions industry.

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