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All Aboard for the Internet of Things

The ‘Web of Everything’ is Expanding Fast…

By Jeremy Geelan

“What makes for a red-hot company?” IDG Connect Editorial Director Martin Veitch asked himself rhetorically in November 2013. “Knowing which closely-held companies have the strength in depth to succeed is an inexact science,” he answered, “but there are some clues.”

A sufficient number of Veitch’s all-important clues – which include good management; a strong story; enthusiastic customers; a vibrant developer/partner community; strong funding from reputable companies; sales; growth; the positive views of experts in the field; market opportunity; and competitive differentiation – existed in the case of Kaazing to lead Veitch to include the Silicon Valley start-up in his final list of “20 Red-Hot, Pre-IPO Companies in 2014 B2B Tech” which IDG Connect, a division of IDG which is in turn the world’s largest technology media company, published November 21, 2013.

“THINK OF IT AS A ROCKET UP THE INTERNET’S TROUSER LEG” ~Martin V. Eitch, Editorial Director, IDG Connect

The IDG article explained how Kaazing “uses the emerging HTML5 Web Socket standard to speed up communications and create what it calls ‘the living Web’. Think of it as a rocket up the Internet’s trouser leg, if you will, or HTTP reimagined for the more liquid world of the modern Web versus the document-centric, static model of the Web circa 1995.”

Veitch then concluded, sagely: “With 5 billion Web users forecast for 2020 and with the Internet connecting to more and more devices, we desperately need this sort of technology to come good.”

His point is well made. In the brave new world that has since 1999 been called ‘Internet of Things’ (commonly abbreviated nowadays to just IoT), there are already millions of embedded electronic measuring devices connected: thermostats, pressure gauges, pollution detectors, cameras, microphones, glucose sensors, EKGs, electroencephalographs. They probe and monitor everything from cities to endangered species. There are sensors monitoring the atmosphere, our ships, highways and fleets of trucks, our conversations (thank you, NSA!), and even – in a movement called the Quantified Self (QS) – our bodies.

In the IoT, the Internet is getting in the way of the things

“The intersection of the Internet of Things and the future will to a very great extent happen on the Web, since nearly everything that technical and business innovators want to do around IoT needs to make use of Internet-level protocols. But the ‘things’ they want to talk to are typically encircled by Web infrastructure like firewalls, proxies and such.”

General Electric, which prefers to call the IoT the “Industrial Internet”, estimates that it will boost global GDP by a whopping $15.3 trillion in 2030. Cisco calls it “Internet of Everything” and is saying to anyone who’ll listen that IoT-related activity will boost global output by $1.6 trillion per annum throughout the next decade.

In his IDG report, Veitch mentioned that there are forecast to be 5 billion Web users by 2020; but what he didn’t mention is that there will be 10x that number of connected “things” – that’s to say, the Internet of Things will be called upon to connect not just 5 billion people, but also 50 billion things, from sensors to milk cartons, with trillions of connections between them. These things, like the people, will be always-on, always-connected, and always trying to communicate.

The intersection of the Internet of Things and the future will to a very great extent happen on the Web, since nearly everything that technical and business innovators want to do around IoT needs to make use of Internet-level protocols. But the “things” they want to talk to are typically encircled by Web infrastructure like firewalls, proxies and such. Which means that what is critically required is an entirely new architecture, a “Web Communication” architecture if you will.

And this is exactly what Kaazing has devised. It has devised gateways that extend benefits of scale, speed, predictability, reliability, and security across the multiple languages (protocols) spoken by the “things” that are becoming so densely connected in the IoT world. In fact Kaazing’s pioneering gateways will allow companies to on-board billions of different things (machines, individuals, and enterprises) to the Web in an always-on and always-connected state at unprecedented scale – and with enterprise grade performance, predictability, reliability, and security.

Kaazing’s customers can expect the performance of the Kaazing Gateway to provide for up to 100x latency and 1000x bandwidth reduction compared to those solutions being supported by the existing, “legacy” Web. In short, Kaazing has found a way to make the Web work more efficiently, securely, and reliably. “With tech company valuations at their highest for quite some time,” wrote Martin Veitch at the conclusion of his “20 Red-Hot, Pre-IPO Companies” piece, “signs of a bounce-back in major economies and several new waves of technological change, these are exciting times to be a new disruptor.”

“Kaazing has devised gateways that extend benefits of scale, speed, predictability, reliability, and security across the multiple languages (protocols) spoken by the ‘things’ that are becoming so densely connected in the IoT world.”

To which all at six-year-old Kaazing, which has recently (October 2013) picked up a little over $8m from NEA and CNTP and is working hard to establish an early but impressive lead in the Internet of Things market, would say one word: “Amen”.

Full disclosure: Jeremy Geelan (@jg21 on Twitter) has since 2007 been Founding Media Adviser to Kaazing Corporation and in November 2013 joined as its full-time CMO.


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